Lorin F. Wheelwright

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Lorin Farrar Wheelwright, a noted Utah music educator, composer, editor, publishing executive, and civic leader, was born in Ogden, Utah on 20 December 1909. He was the son of David S. Wheelwright and Valborg Rasmussen. His mother was an immigrant from Denmark. Wheelwright was the younger brother of D. Sterling Wheelwright, who was one of his early music teachers. While still young he was a Sunday School pianist, and then ward choir pianist in the Ogden 12th Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Wheelwright studied under Edward P. Kimball and Alexander Schreiner. He then studied at Columbia University and the Juilliard School of Music. He received a master's degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Wheelwright succeeded J. Spencer Cornwall as the head of music education for the Salt Lake Public Schools. He also taught at Oswego Teachers College in New York. He was also a professor at Branch Agricultural College. After retiring as an educator, Wheelwright formed a publishing company.

From 1967 and 1974 he served as Dean of the College of Fine Arts at Brigham Young University. He founded the annual Mormon Festival of Arts in 1969 to give artistic expression to Mormon culture, beliefs, and values through compositions, musical performances, plays, operas, painting, writing, and other art forms. When he was appointed in 1973 as assistant to the president in charge of the Centennial observance, he was succeeded as dean by Dr. Lael J. Woodbury.

Among the hymns that Wheelwright wrote are "O Love That Glorifies the Son", "Help Me Teach With Inspiration" and "Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee".

Lorin Wheelwright died on 4 November 1987 in Provo, Utah.

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Dr. Lorin F. Wheelwright, right, a noted Utah music educator, composer, editor, publishing executive, and civic leader, became dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications in 1967. He founded the annual Mormon Festival of Arts in 1969 to give artistic expression to Mormon culture, beliefs, and values through compositions, musical performances, plays, operas, painting, writing, and other art forms. When he was appointed in 1973 as assistant to the president in charge of the Centennial observance, he was succeeded as dean by Dr. Lael J. Woodbury, left The central committee in charge of planning and carrying out the observance of the BYU Centennial year included Dr. Lorin F. Wheelwright, front left, assistant to the president; D'Ann Allred, secretary; Dr. George S. Barrus, professor of communications; Max C. Wilson, assistant to Dr. Wheelwright; and Edwin Butterworth, Jr., director of public communications. They were assisted by Herbert E. McLean, Provo advertising executive. Planned for the celebration were a monumental three-volume history of BYU under the direction of BYU President Emeritus Ernest L. Wilkinson, a pictorial history by Edwin Butterworth, Jr., the construction of the bell tower, the musical stage shows "The Ballad of Brigham Young" and "Right Honorable Saint" a Centennial motion picture, record albums, the opening of the Maeser Building cornerstone, radio vignettes, newspaper cartoons, the dedication of the J. Reuben Clark Law Building, supplements to newspapers, an International Folk Dance Festival, a 1975 NCAA track meet, lectures, concerts, plays, operas, seminars, exhibits, campus decorations, and much more

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